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Arrington, Tennessee is a great place for people who want a little peace and quiet without being too far away. This beautiful, pastoral community is located just a few minutes from the city of Franklin, Interstates 65 and 24 and Murfreesboro, but its fresh air and wide open spaces can help you create more mental distance, if you want, from the crowds, traffic and stress of the city.

 

The unincorporated community Arrington, located in Williamson County, is mostly farmland and as part of Tennessee horse country, several local farms are devoted to breeding and housing horses of all types.

 

With an on site private horse barn and plans for a future polo field, Arrington’s best new neighborhood, Kings’ Chapel, can be found in Arrington on Highway 96, just east of Franklin, a country road that intersects with busy I-65.  Head north from that point and you can be in Nashville in around 30 minutes.

 

Along your way to the interstate from Kings’ Chapel, you’ll drive past Williamson Medical Center where the array of health care services is always growing.

 

In Franklin, Highway 96 (also called Murfreesboro Road in these parts) continues west of the I-65 junction, going all the way to historic downtown and the antique district.

 

The great thing about Kings’ Chapel’s location is that it’s on the “easy” east side of Franklin, from a commuter’s point of view.  Another great convenience factor – the Publix grocery store off Liberty Pike in Franklin is less than 10 minutes from the Kings’ Chapel gate.

 

Local historian Lyn Sullivan Pewitt in her book, “Back Home In Williamson County,” says in 1858, the village took its name from Arrington Creek which meanders through the scenic, gated community of Kings’ Chapel.

 

Pewitt cites one of the first churches in Williamson County as Kings’ Chapel. The Methodist church was built around 1815 under the direction of then circuit rider William McKendree, who later became a bishop. “Huge outdoor meetings were held at King’s Campground by early ministers…One of Williamson County’s earliest settlers William Edmondson is buried at Kings’ Chapel. “

 

Today, under the vision and financing of community developer John Powell, the church at Kings’ Chapel was painstakingly reconstructed in its original footprint and is used year around for weddings, neighborhood, family and religious events.

 

But Arrington has its own attractions, too. For openers, there’s the green, unspoiled country punctuated by scenic hills, mature hardwood trees of all types, and other natural flora.  It really isn’t all that unusual to see deer or turkey in your yard or perhaps a pretty rabble of butterflies. Arrington’s most familiar man-made feature is Arrington Vineyards, an award-winning farm and winery created by Kip Summers, a Kings’ Chapel resident, Fred Mindermann and country music legend Kix Brooks.

 

Located on Patton Road, Arrington Vineyards is open to the public for tours and there are on-site wine tastings in the retail shop, where all of the wines are sold.

 

Natives as well as visitors enjoy the vineyard’s free “Music in the Vines” concerts, which are often scheduled on Friday and Saturday evenings, as well as Sunday afternoons. Click here for a current concert schedule. Folks bring their own picnic dinners, blankets and lawn chairs and then kick back to hear the music and probably, sip some wine.

 

Arrington is also home for the annual Tennessee Renaissance Festival that happens each May.

 

Tickets to this unusual event are sold to the public but the festival is conducted on private property at 2124 New Castle Road in Arrington, where the owners have built an authentic, turreted castle that is also their home.

 

Castle Gwynn is opened for tours during the run of the festival, which celebrates the culture of 16th century England.  More than 60 artisans participate in the marketplace and there’s actual jousting by knights in shining armor, games of skill, specialty foods and drinks and free children’s activities.

 

To get the schedule for this year’s festival, visit Tennessee Renaissance Festival. 

 

To partake of the horse culture in Arrington, you can call or visit Peachtree Farms at 4819 Murfreesboro Road.  They offer training, riding lessons, camps and clinics, as well as birthday parties for kids where the featured attraction is pony rides.

 

If you need to load up on your riding supplies, head over to Horsin’ Around at 4812 Murfreesboro Road, a local boutique devoted to all things equestrian.

 

In addition to all of the shopping in Franklin and Cool Springs, Arrington and Kings’ Chapel are also a short distance from the developing antique district of Nolensville, which lies to the north.

 

Just turn onto the Horton Highway from Murfreesboro Road (Highway 96 east).  Horton Highway goes straight into charming “downtown” Nolensville.  In addition to the antique shops, there’s the Amish Country Market at The Feed Mill as well as Martin’s Bar-B-Que Joint, a favorite of many Williamson County residents.